University of California, Riverside

Department of Mechanical Engineering



Graduate Courses


Graduate Courses

ME 200. Methods of Engineering Analysis (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in engineering or consent of instructor. Topics include linear algebra theory, vector spaces, eigenvalue problems, complex analytic functions, contour integration, integral transforms, and basic methods for solving ordinary and partial differential equations in mechanical engineering applications.

ME 201. Computational Methods in Engineering (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Explores numerical methods with computer applications. Topics include solution of nonlinear algebraic equations, solution of systems of linear equations, interpolation, integration, statistical description of data, model fitting, Fast Fourier Transform and applications, and numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations.

ME 202. Spectral Computational Methods (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; consultation, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 200 or equivalent; ME 240A is recommended. Introduces data analysis, including discrete Fourier transforms, sampling theorem, and power spectra. Reviews Sturm-Liouville eigenfunction expansions, Gibbs phenomenon, convergence theorems, and Chebyschev transforms. Additional topics include Galerkin, tau, collocation, and pseudospectral methods, aliasing, time-advancement, and numerical stability. Explores applications to incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, compressible flows, reacting flows, and complex geometries. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor. Course is repeatable as content changes.

 ME 203. Design and Analysis of Engineering Experiments (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduces research methods in engineering. Topics include design of experiments,basic statistical tools, data analysis in the time-domain and frequency domain, machine learning and pattern recognition approaches, and computational tools. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

 ME 210. Sustainable Product Design (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; consultation, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduces the principles of sustainable product design. Topics include life cycle design; design for reliability, maintainability, and recycling/reuse/remanufacture; materials selection; and manufacturing processes. Includes project in which students analyze the environmental impact of a product and redesign it to reduce the impact. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor. Course is repeatable as content changes. Credit is awarded for only one of ME 176 or ME 210.

ME 220 Optimal Control and Estimation (4)

Lecture, 4 hours; term paper, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 120, ME 121 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Intro­duces optimal control and estimation with specific focus on discrete time linear systems. Topics include analysis of discrete Riccati equations; asymptotic properties of optimal controllers; optimal tracking; an introduction to Receding Horizon control; derivation of the Kalman filter; Extended Kalman Filter; and Unscented Kalman filter. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 222. Advanced Robotics (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): EE 236; ME 120 or equivalent. Topics include robot navigation; description of robot sensors and their characteristics; sensor data processing; feature extraction; and matching. Also covers representations of space for mapping; map-based localization; simultaneous localization and mapping; image-based motion estimation; and motion planning. Cross-listed with EE 245.

ME 230. Computer-Aided Engineering Design (4)

    Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduces fundamentals of interactive computer graphics, three-dimensional representations of curves and surfaces, Bezier parameterizations, and optimization methods. Demonstrates applications of computer graphics and computational geometry to mechanical system simulations, computer-aided design, and engineering design.

ME 231. Pen-Based Computing (4)

    Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite (s): graduate standing or consent of instructor; computer programming experience. Introduction to computational techniques for pen-based user interfaces. Covers fundamental issues such as ink segmentation, sketch parsing, and shape recognition. Explores the topic of sketch understanding, including reasoning about context and correcting errors, and issues related to building practical penbased systems. Includes a project in which students build a pe-based application. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 232. Computational Design Tools (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to the theoretical foundations and practical application of computational techniques for engineering design. Topics include geometric modeling, numerical optimization, and artificial intelligence techniques. Includes programming projects in which both symbolic and numerical computational techniques are used to solve engineering problems. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 233. Artificial Intelligence for Design (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Explores the application of artificial intelligence to engineering design. Topics include the use of search, knowledge-based systems, machine learning, and qualitative physical reasoning for design automation. Addresses the theory behind these techniques and issues related to their practical application. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor. Course is repeatable as content changes.

ME 235 Linear System Theory (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): EE 132. Provides a review of linear algebra. Topics include the mathe­matical description of linear systems; the solution of state-space equations; controllability and observability; canonical and minimal realization; and state feedback, pole placement, observer design, and compensator design. Cross-listed with EE 235.

ME 240A. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to fluid mechanics. Explores equations of motion, stress tensor, the Navier-Stokes equations, boundary conditions, exact solutions, vorticity, and boundary layers.

ME 240B. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 240A or consent of instructor. Covers inviscid flow, the Euler and Bernouli equations, potential flow, and wing theory and introduces stability theory and turbulence.

ME 241A. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 240A or consent of instructor. Introduces in-depth derivations of equations and principles governing heat and mass transfer with an emphasis on formulation of problems. Topics include equations involved in conduction, convection, radiation, energy, and species conservation and the analytical and numerical solution of transport problems.

ME 241B. Transport through Porous Media (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing. Covers current theories on flow, heat, and mass transfer and the mechanisms of multiphase transport in porous media.

ME 241C. Electronic Cooling and Thermal Issues in Microelectronics (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing. Discusses thermal issues associated with the life cycle of electronic products. Covers passive, active, and hybrid thermal management techniques, computational modeling approaches, and advanced thermal management concepts such as single phase, phase change and heat pipes.

ME 242. Turbulence in Fluids (4)

Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 240A or consent of instructor. An introduction to the application of fundamental conservation laws of mechanics (mass, momentum, and energy) to the modeling of complex turbulent natural and human-made flows. Covers tensor notation, statistical and spectral analysis, and basic turbulent closure techniques, including understanding of turbulence with intuitive insight into the problems that cannot be rigorously solved. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) by students advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D.

ME 243. Advanced Mechanical Engineering Thermodynamics (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 100A or equivalent. Introduces the fundamental statistical foundations of classical thermodynamics. Explores the origins of entropy, temperature, pressure, chemical potential, and the free energies. Applications include chemical equilibrium and reactions, phase equilibrium and transitions including vapor-liquid and solid-solid, fluctuations, and thermodynamics in nanoscale systems. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 244. Nanoscale Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion (4) F

Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): at least two of EE 201/MSE 207, EE 202/MSE 217, ME 100A, ME 116A, or equivalents. Explores fundamental processes of energy transport and conversion at short length and time scales. Introduces classical and quantum-mechanical size effects on electrons, phonons, and photons. Topics include modes of energy storage, coupling between energy carriers, and electrical and thermal transport using the Boltzmann transport equation and/or kinetic theory. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 245. Radiative Heat Transfer (4)

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 116A or ME 116B or equivalent or consent of instructor. Offers in-depth study of topics related to radiative heat transfer. Builds upon curriculum of radiation presented at the undergraduate level. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 246. Computational Fluid Dynamics with Applications (4)

    Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 240A or consent of instructor. Introduces finite difference, finite volume, and finite element; spectral methods, governing equations for nonreacting and reacting flows; and stability and convergence for steady and unsteady problems. Students use commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for the course project.

ME 248. Internal Combustion Engines (4) F

Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 100A; graduate standing. Covers engine types and their operation. Also addresses engine design and operating parameters, thermochemistry of fuel-air mixture, engine cycles, spark ignition and compressed ignition engines, and emissions. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC)

ME 250. Seminar in Mechanical Engineering (1 or 2)

    Seminar, 1 or 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing. Seminar in selected topics in mechanical engineering presented by graduate students, staff, faculty, and invited speakers. Students who present a seminar receive a letter grade; other students receive a Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) grade. Course is repeatable.

ME 255. Transport Processes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (4)

Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 100A or CHE 100, ME 113 or CHE 114, and ME 116A or CHE 116; or consent of instructor. Examines heat, mass, and momentum transport processes in the atmospheric boundary layer using current understanding of micrometeorology. Topics includes surface energy balance, Monin-Obukhov Similarity theory, and dispersion of pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 261. Theory of Elasticity (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 110 or consent of instructor. Introduction to tensors, strain, equations of motion, and constitutive equations. Topics include typical boundary value problems of classical elasticity, problems of plane strain and plane stress, and variational principles.

ME 266. Mechanics and Physics of Materials (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduces the structure and properties of materials; the characterization and modeling of mechanical, thermal, electric, and magnetic properties of materials; and coupling properties. Topics include phase transformations and brittle-to-ductile transitions.

ME 267. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 261 or consent of instructor. Covers the formulation and implementation of finite element methods, including the Galerkin and energy methods. Topics include the static and dynamic analysis of mechanical and multiphysical systems and techniques of automatic mesh generation.

ME 270. Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems (4)

    Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 014, ME 110, or equivalents. An introduction to the design and fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Topics include bulk and surface micromachining processes; material properties; mechanisms of transduction; applications in mechanical, thermal, optical, radiation, and biological sensors and actuators; fabrication of microfluidic devices; Bio-MEMS and applications; packaging and reliability concepts; and metrology techniques for MEMS. Also discusses directions for future research.

ME 271. Therapeutic Biomedical Microdevices (4)

Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 270/MSE 238 or equivalent or consent of instructor. An introduction to the application of micro device technology towards biomedical therapeutics. Topics include emerging micro device fabrication techniques, bio compatibility requirements, and applications in areas such as cardiovascular intervention, minimally-invasive drug delivery, neuroprosthetic interfaces, and cellular engineering. May be taken Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) with consent of instructor and graduate advisor.

ME 272. Nanoscale Science and Engineering (4)

    Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 01H or consent of instructor. An overview of the machinery and science of the nanometer scale. Topics include patterning of materials via scanning probe lithography; electron beam lithography; nanoimprinting; self-assembly; mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and chemical properties of nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, and biomolecules (DNA, protein); self-assembled monolayers; and nanocomposites and synthetic macromolecules.

ME 273. Principles and Designs of Micro Transducers (4)

Lecture, 4 hours; term paper, 1 hour; extra reading, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): ME 270/ MSE 238 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Emphasizes physical principles and designs of microscopic sensors and actuators. Topics include macroscopic and microscopic physical phenomena and properties; signal processing; mechanical transducers; thermal transducers; electrical transducers; magnetic transducers; optical transducers; chemical and biological transducers; and applications in areas such as lab-on-a-chip, medical diagnosis and power MEMS.

ME 274. Plasma-aided Manufacturing and Materials Processing (4)

Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ME 243 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Covers the fundamentals of gaseous plasmas and the physics of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium discharges. Covers the basic techniques for plasma diagnostics. Discusses the use of plasmas as a materials processing medium for a variety of manufacturing processes. Advanced topics such as the processing of nanostructured materials using plasmas are included.

ME 278. Imperfections in Solids (4)

    Lecture, 3 hours, discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Chemical and Environmental Engineering or Computer Science or Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering. Covers fundamentals of crystal structures and crystal defects, including the generation of point defects; nucleation and propagation of dislocations; perfect and partial dislocations; twins, stacking faults, and transformations; mechanics of semiconductor and metallic thin films and multilayered structures.

ME 290. Directed Studies (1-6)

    Individual study, 3-18 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing; consent of instructor and graduate advisor. Individual study, directed by a faculty member, of selected topics in mechanical engineering. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 units.

ME 297. Directed Research (1-4)

    Outside research, 3-18 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing; consent of instructor. Research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member on selected problems in mechanical engineering. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 units.

ME 298-I Individual Internship (1-12) F, W, S, Summer

Internship, 2-24 hours; written work, 1-12 hours. Pre­requisite(s): graduate standing; consent of graduate advisor. An individual apprenticeship in Mechanical Engineering with an approved professional individual or organization. Includes academic work under the direction of a faculty member. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 units.

ME 299. Research for the Thesis or Dissertation (1-12)

    Outside research, 3-36 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing; consent of instructor. Research in mechanical engineering for the M.S. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.

ME 302 Apprentice Teaching (1-4) Seminar, 1-4 hours.

Prerequisite(s): appointment as a teaching assistant or an associate in Mechanical Engineering. Topics include effective teaching methods, such as those involved in leading discussion sections and preparing and grading examinations, and student-instructor relations in lower- and upper-division Mechanical Engineering courses. Required each quarter of teaching assistants and associates in Mechanical Engineering. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 units.

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

College Information

Bourns College of Engineering
446 Winston Chung Hall

Tel: (951) 827-5190
Fax: (951) 827-3188
E-mail: collegeinfo@engr.ucr.edu

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