University of California, Riverside

Department of Mechanical Engineering


Welcome to the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Our mission is to provide quality education, conduct strong research, foster close partnership with industry and government, and provide related service to the campus community and the community at large. The mission is guided by a commitment to continuous improvement in the overall quality of teaching, research, and service, while adhering to the highest standard of ethics. More

News and Spotlights: 2016-2017 

 ME Department Welcomes Three New Faculty


Sinisa Coh
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Rutgers University

Sinisa Coh

Sinisa Coh is a computational materials theorist working on a broad range of topics: nanostructures, oxides, layered materials, electron-phonon interaction, optical properties, and topological insulators. His research focuses on design, discovery, and characterization of functional materials from control and first-principles understanding of atomic interactions and electronic structure. Some of Sinisa’s past works include showing how a solid iron nanocrystal can pass through a constriction in the carbon nanotube with a smaller cross-sectional area than the nanocrystal itself; or how like-charged molecules placed on top of graphene can attract rather than repel each other. He also proposed — based on the properties of topological insulators — a class of materials with a new coupling mechanism between the magnetic and the electric degrees of freedom. Sinisa received his Ph.D in Physics from Rutgers University in 2011 and afterwards he joined University of California Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab as a postdoctoral fellow in Physics and Materials Science. Foundation, the US Department of Energy, and the US National Science foundation.


Shane Cybart
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of California, San Diego

Shane Cybart

The research in my lab is intended to understand and apply functional oxide electronic materials. The electrons responsible for transport in these materials are “highly correlated” and cannot be described like conventional metallic conductors as a collection of nuclei and free electrons. Instead in strongly correlated materials the interaction of the electrons with one another leads to exotic functionalities. Two of these materials currently of interest to my group are high-TC superconductors and multiferroics. The mechanisms of the electronic properties in both of these materials is not well-understood. For basic science studies use and develop techniques like confined geometry (1 dimensional lines or ultra-thin films), electron tunneling, and ion beam-induced disorder to, modify, structure and confine these materials to better understand their properties.
In parallel, another thrust of my research is to look for ways to exploit the novel functionalities of oxide electronic materials for applications. Currently we partner with industry to engineer these materials into new types of devices for aerospace and biomedical applications such as aircraft and satellite communication components, bio-medical sensors, and high performance computing. This is a multi-disciplinary process in which we combine materials science, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and physics to build prototype systems. From the thin film growth of the basic materials to the design of the mechanical and electrical system components we engineer complete systems from start to finish with the goal of transferring novel technology from a university research lab to industry.


Chen Li
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

chen liDr. Li received his B.Sc. in Physics from Peking University in 2003 and his Ph.D. in Materials Science from California Institute of Technology in 2012. After postdoctoral research in the Materials Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, he worked as a research scientist in the Geophysical Laboratory at Carnegie Institution for Science and an affiliated faculty at Chemical and Engineering Materials Division at Spallation Neutron Source before joining the University of California, Riverside. His research focuses on the understanding the phonon dynamics, phonon coupling with other excitations, and transport properties in energy materials, including thermoelectrics, negative thermal expansion materials, phase change materials, and many others. The group uses Raman, neutron scattering, and synchrotron X-ray scattering and applies diamond anvil cell (DAC) technique for high pressure study of energy materials. 

From Ancient Fossils to Future Cars

cengiz and mihri ozkan
 UC Riverside engineers are developing cheap, energy-efficient lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles from silicon in diatomaceous earth.... Full story 



Department Videos


Living the Promise: Marko Princevac


 Living the Promise: Guillermo Aguilar


Living the Promise: Hideaki Tsutsui 



More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

College Information

Bourns College of Engineering
446 Winston Chung Hall

Tel: (951) 827-5190
Fax: (951) 827-3188